Paresthesia

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Paresthesia causes

Paresthesia comes from a variety of underlying medical causes and conditions. Some are serious disorders, while others may be not as severe yet chronic, and others transient or passing.

Common causes of paresthesia, and situations in which it might be found, include:

Alcoholism
Anticonvulsant drugs
Atherosclerosis
Autoimmune disorders
Beta-alanine ingestion
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Dehydration
Diabetes
Fabry disease
Fibromyalgia (FMS)
Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS)
Heavy metal poisoning
Herniated disc
Herpes zoster (shingles)
Hyperventilation
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
Hypoparathyroidism
Hypothyroidism
Immune deficiency
Lidocaine poisoning
Lomotil (drug)
Lupus erythematosus
Lyme disease
Malnutrition
Menopause
Metabolic disorders
Migraines
Motor neuron diseases
Multiple sclerosis (MS)
Nerve irritation
Neurological disorders


Nitrous oxide exposure (long term)
Obdormition
Peripheral neuropathy
Radiation poisoning
Radiculopathy
Sciatica
SSRI withdrawal
Transient ischemic attack (TIA)
Vitamin B12 deficiency
Vitamin B5 deficiency
Whiplash

Please note that the presence of paresthesia in a patient does not necessarily mean that one of these issues is the underlying cause. Also, it is possible to have one or more of these conditions despite a lack of paresthesia in the individual. This list and additional information is not intended to be professional medical advice and is not to be used as a substitute for such.

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